Most modern Linux systems use a package manager to make software installation easy.
Debian/Ubuntu offers Oracles MySQL Community Edition in their repos.
Red Hat/CentOS repositories recently replaced MySQL witth MariaDB
Debian/Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install mysql-server
Red Hat/CentOS: install MariaDB with su -c 'yum install mariadb-server'

Read This page first: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/mysql-repo-excerpt/5.6/en/linuxinstallation-yum-repo.html

This will let you know the the repository comes with 5.7 enabled as the default install when you run: yum install mysql-community-server.
To set 5.6 as the default when you run yum install mysql-community-server you need to disable 5.7 and enable 5.6
shell> yum-config-manager --disable mysql57-community
shell> yum-config-manager --enable mysql56-community
Install MySQL With Package Manager

Register one of Oracle’s repositories and install MySQL Community Edition from it.(Install MySQL With Package Manager)
1. Open a browser and navigate to the MySQL Repositories page at http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/repo.
2. Click the Download link for the MySQL Yum Repository or MySQL APT Repository depending on your platform s package manager. You’ll be redirected to a page that lists various configuration packages.
3. Click the Download button next to the package appropriate for your system. For example, a Red Hat/CentOS 7 user should download the package Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 / Oracle Linux 7 (Architecture Independent), RPM Package. An Ubuntu user using Trusty Tahr should download the package Ubuntu Linux 14.04 (Architecture Independent), DEB.
4. Oracle will try to trick you into signing up for an account. This isn’t mandatory, so scroll down to the bottom of the page and click the link No thanks, just start my download to start the download.
5. Using a terminal window, navigate to the directory you downloaded (or copied) the package to and execute the appropriate command to install it:
Red Hat/CentOS users should run rpm -i mysql-community-release-el7-5.noarch.rpm
Debian/Ubuntu users should run dpkg -i mysql-apt-config_0.2.1-1ubuntu14.04_all.deb
6. The repository is now registered and you can install MySQL Community Edition with your package manager:
Red Hat/CentOS users should run su -c 'yum install mysql-communityserver'
Debian/Ubuntu users should run sudo apt-get install mysql-server-5.6
Ubuntu users will be prompted during the installation process for a password for
MySQL’s root user (Debian and Red Hat/CentOS users will provide this password with a post-install command in the next step).  MySQL maintains its own list of accounts separate from the user accounts on your operating system that is, while the username may be the same, the MySQL root user isn’t the same as the Linux root user.

Red Hat/CentOS users should run these post-install commands to set the password for MySQL s root user, register MySQL as a system service, and start a running instance (Debian/Ubuntu automatically registers and starts MySQL):

1. Set the root user s password for MySQL: mysqladmin -u root password
2. Register MySQL to start when the system boots: su -c 'chkconfig --level 2345 mysqld on'
3. Start the MySQL server: su -c 'systemctl start mysql'
MySQL Community Edition is now installed on your system. For future reference, the following commands are used to start, stop, and check the running status of MySQL:
Start MySQL
Ubuntu sudo service mysql start
Debian sudo systemctl start mysqld
Red Hat/CentOS su -c 'systemctl start mysql'

Stop MySQL
Ubuntu sudo service mysql stop
Debian sudo systemctl stop mysqld
Red Hat/CentOS su -c 'systemctl stop mysql'

Query MySQL s running state 
Ubuntu service mysql status
Debian sudo systemctl status mysqld
Red Hat/CentOS su -c 'systemctl status mysql'

http://techhowdy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/How-to-Install-MySQL-via-a-Package-Manager-in-Linux.jpghttp://techhowdy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/How-to-Install-MySQL-via-a-Package-Manager-in-Linux-150x150.jpgDemonHow ToMost modern Linux systems use a package manager to make software installation easy. Debian/Ubuntu offers Oracles MySQL Community Edition in their repos. Red Hat/CentOS repositories recently replaced MySQL witth MariaDB Debian/Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install mysql-server Red Hat/CentOS: install MariaDB with su -c 'yum install mariadb-server'Read This page first: https://dev.mysql.com/doc/mysql-repo-excerpt/5.6/en/linuxinstallation-yum-repo.htmlThis will let you know the...Latest technology news